DCA, Barret Bookstore welcoming Wendy Kopp, Walter Isaacson

Barrett Bookstore, and the Darien Community Association are welcoming Walter Isaacson, a bestselling author, for a conversation with Wendy Kopp, the CEO, and cofounder of Teach Teach For All, to discuss Isaacon's new book titled: "The Code Breaker: Jennifer Doudna, Gene Editing, and the Future of the Human Race," April 7, at 7 p.m. on Crowdcast.

Barrett Bookstore, and the Darien Community Association are welcoming Walter Isaacson, a bestselling author, for a conversation with Wendy Kopp, the CEO, and cofounder of Teach Teach For All, to discuss Isaacon’s new book titled: “The Code Breaker: Jennifer Doudna, Gene Editing, and the Future of the Human Race,” April 7, at 7 p.m. on Crowdcast.

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Barrett Bookstore, and the Darien Community Association are welcoming Walter Isaacson, a bestselling author, for a conversation with Wendy Kopp, the CEO, and cofounder of Teach Teach For All, to discuss Isaacon’s new book titled: “The Code Breaker: Jennifer Doudna, Gene Editing, and the Future of the Human Race,” April 7, at 7 p.m. on Crowdcast.

Bestselling author Walter Isaacson has established himself as the biographer of creativity, innovation, and genius.

The genius at the center of his newest book, The Code Breaker, is American biochemist Jennifer Doudna, who is considered one of the prime inventors of CRISPR, a system that can edit DNA. Doudna’s story begins when she was a sixth-grader in Hilo, Hawaii, and she came home from school one afternoon to find a book on her bed.

It was The Double Helix, James Watson’s account of how he and Francis Crick had discovered the structure of DNA, the spiral-staircase molecule that carries the genetic instruction code for all forms of life. Doudna put the book aside, thinking it was a detective tale. When she read it, she discovered that she was right, in a way. As she sped through the pages, she became enthralled by the race to put together clues, both in competition and cooperation with other scientists, that culminated in the 1953 discovery of the building block of life. Even though her high school counselor told her girls didn’t become scientists, she decided she would.

Driven by a passion to understand how nature works and to turn discoveries into inventions, Doudna would help to make what James Watson told her was the most important biological advance since his co-discovery of the structure of DNA. She and her collaborators turned their curiosity into an invention that would transform the human race: an easy-to-use tool that can edit DNA. Known as CRISPR, it opened a brave new world of medical miracles and moral questions. This is a virtual, ticketed event. Ticket includes a copy of the book.

Visit https:// dariendca.org/book-talks-and-signings to register, and to receive the link to the virtual ticketed conversation event. A ticket includes a copy of the book.