Mixologist: Mather Homestead in Darien holding virtual event

Here is the Mather Homestead's new Education Center's roof going up in a previous year. The homestead is having Derek Brown, a writer, mixologist and expert on the history, and culture of spirits and drinks for a virtual cocktail event Jan. 30, at 7 p.m.

Here is the Mather Homestead's new Education Center's roof going up in a previous year. The homestead is having Derek Brown, a writer, mixologist and expert on the history, and culture of spirits and drinks for a virtual cocktail event Jan. 30, at 7 p.m.

Contributed photo

The Mather Homestead is hosting Derek Brown, a writer, mixologist and expert on the history, and culture of spirits and drinks for a virtual cocktail event Jan. 30, at 7 p.m.

He will tell attendees stories of what beverages Founding Fathers consumed, which was not water, and show attendees how to mix up colonial-inspired cocktails that are meant for fire involved, and experienced mixologists.

Attendees can also pickup his recent book titled: “Spirits Sugar Water Bitters: How the Cocktail Conquered the World,” Jan. 30. He has had cocktails with Barack and Michelle Obama, traveled the world, and is an acclaimed speaker.

The event costs $100 for two people, and includes a hardcover copy of his book, food (an hors d’oeuvre box), one of Derek’s drinks, and the fun evening. Visit matherhomestead.org for tickets.

Attendees will also be able to pickup a copy of his book Jan. 30 between 4 and 5 p.m.

The book is about the story of the cocktail drink, which is “the only American invention as perfect as the sonnet,” according to H.L. Mencken, a journalist.

The Mather Homestead, located at 19 Stephen Mather Road in Darien, was built in 1778 by Deacon Joseph Mather and owned by the Mather family through seven generations, until 2017 when it was donated to The Mather Homestead Foundation thanks to the generosity of the McPherson family, who are Mather descendants.

The homestead is an example of 18th century architecture and has retained its character for more than roughly 250 years. It is open for the public to enjoy, and for education about 18th century American history, including Revolutionary War times, and the legacy of Stephen Tyng Mather (1867-1930), a renowned conservationist who founded our National Park Service.

Visit matherhomestead.org for more information about the homestead.