Binge and Repeat: The Kominsky Method explores grief

Chuck Lorre has previously had his hand in a number of comedies that revolve around a particular duo. He’s known for Two and a Half Men, Two Broke Girls, Mom, The Big Bang Theory and a slew of other shows. In his latest series, The Kominsky Method, Lorre gives audiences a comedy about two geriatric men trucking through life in their golden years.

Alan Arkin and Michael Douglas team up in this series as they crack jokes about the cruelty of time and bemoan their prostate issues. Douglas plays Sandy Kominsky, an aging acting coach still looking for roles while trying to evade the responsibilities of adult life. Arkin is Norman, Sandy’s cynical agent and best friend.

After the death of Norman’s wife Eileen, the two friends are forced to face their own mortality and that they don’t have someone to grow old with. After Eileen’s death, Sandy attempts to provide Norman with additional emotional support while dating one of his acting students. Norman closes himself off after her death and frequently talks to her ghost as he moves through the grieving process. Arkin gifts the audience with a brilliant portrayal of Norman’s grief, the audience can palpably feel the rage washing over him at the shattering realization that he has to live in a world without his wife. We watch as Norman manically tries to prepare the perfect funeral for her to distract himself from the loss and the tenderness he has for his wife as he speaks to her ghost about everything from what tie to wear to his troubles with his daughter.

While the show deals with heavier themes it also provides viewers with plenty of humor, like casting Danny Devito as a proctologist, or having Arkin utter the phrase “true dat.”

The Kominsky Method has one season available on Netflix. Viewers might also enjoy watching a lighter and campier romp, The Santa Clarita Diet, a Netflix series about a suburban mom suddenly becoming a zombie.